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Stefan Goßner reminds us of the fact that support for WSS 3.0 SP1, SharePoint 2007 SP1 and Project Server SP1 will soon end.

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Microsoft extends support for WSS 3.0, SharePoint 2007 and Project Server SP1

Stefan Goßner reminds us of the fact that support for WSS 3.0 SP1, SharePoint 2007 SP1 and Project Server SP1 will soon end.

Support ends when the next service pack is out for over a year. And SP2 was released so SP1 won’t be supported from , so roughly in 3 months.

Be sure to test & deploy your upgrade soon!

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I was having trouble with the clock in my Linux Hyper-V VM’s. The time was constantly drifting forward. Using NTP only slowed the drift a bit down but often NTP gave up after several days.

I was having trouble with the clock in my Linux Hyper-V VM’s. The time was constantly drifting forward. Using NTP (Network Time Protocol) only slowed the drift a bit down but often the NTP service gave up after several days.

I tried a lot of NTP configurations, but basically the local clock was just unreliable. Even using rdate every 10 minutes was already showing backwards jumps of several seconds. As one of my VM’s is running dovecot this really was a problem because dovecot hates time moving backwards.

I finally found the solution posted by Mat Mirabito in his blogpost Linux (specifically CentOS running trixbox) gains excessive time on system clock.

Edit your grub.conf and add the following to the kernel line:

divider=10 clocksource=acpi_pm

After this it works like… clockwork 🙂

Filed under Hyper-V
Last update:
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I’m running Linux in Hyper-V VM’s since the launch of the Windows Server 2008 RTM. It was quite complex to get performance and support for the network drivers.
Recently with the launch of Windows Server 2008 R2 there are also new Linux Integration Components which also work for 2008 RTM.
Here is the list of steps to install CentOS with these components.

I’m running Linux in Hyper-V VM’s since the launch of the Windows Server 2008 RTM. But in the beginning it was quite complex to get real performance and support for the network drivers.

But recently with the launch of Windows Server 2008 R2 there are also new Linux Integration Components which also work for Windows Server 2008 RTM. So here is the list of steps to install CentOS with the integration components.

  1. Download the latest CentOS distribution from http://mirror.centos.org/centos/5/isos/ (I use the x86_64 version).
  2. Create a VM, I suggest:

    >400MB memory
    Add a Legacy Network Adapter (connect to network)
    Add a Network Adapter (connect to network)

  3. Mount the CDROM and install CentOS (I use the minimal setup)
  4. After the installation is done make certain you’re up to date
    yum update
  5. Install the required components for the Linux Integration Components
    yum install gcc make gnupg kernel-devel
  6. Reboot into the latest kernel
  7. Download the Linux Integration Components
  8. Mount the CDROM and copy the contents
    mkdir -p /mnt/cdrom
    mount /dev/cdrom /mnt/cdrom
    cp -rp /mnt/cdrom /opt/linux_ic
    umount /mnt/cdrom
  9. Build the drivers
    cd /opt/linux_ic
    ./setup.pl drivers

    If you get the message No kernel-xen-devel or kernel-source package installed. You must install this package before installing the drivers. edit the setup.pl file and change the following:

    -$kernel = `rpm -q kernel-xen-devel`;
    +$kernel = `rpm -q kernel-devel`;

    If everything went OK you can now see a new nic (network interface controller) called seth0 using ifconfig

  10. You can now remove the Legacy Network Adapter.

Remember, every time you update the kernel you have to run the setup.pl drivers command.

Filed under Hyper-V
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