Skip to content
/

When adding emoticons to your PowerPoint slides, sometimes the rendering might not be as expected.

For example, PowerPoint renders the emoticon only in a textual, monochrome variant on the slide.

So, how can we influence this behavior?

When adding emoticons to your PowerPoint slides, sometimes the rendering might not be as expected.

For example, when selecting the desktop emoticon on my system, PowerPoint renders the emoticon only in a textual, monochrome variant on the slide.

After selecting the desktop emoticon, it is rendered as text, not an emoji.

I encountered this behavior multiple times myself and can depend on the machine used to view the PowerPoint presentation, while other persons looking at the same file at the same time can see the emoji rendering.

So, how can we influence this behavior?

Unicode variation selector

I discovered an old post by Matias Singers about Unicode symbol as text or emoji.
The article describes the Unicode variation selectors.

By adding variation selector-15, or variation selector-16, after an emoticon the rendering of the character can be influenced.

Switch from text to emoji

Using variation selector-16 after the emoticon, the character will be forced to be rendered as a colorful image. Inserting character U+FE0F after the desktop character will change it in the expected emoji:

The desktop emoticon rendered as a colorful emoji after adding variation selector-16.

Switch from emoji to text

This can also be used the other way around. When a more textual or monochrome variant would be beneficial, this can be forced to render as well.

Let's start with the house with garden emoticon.

The house with garden emoticon rendered as a colorful emoji.

Using variation selector-15 after the emoticon, the character will be forced to be rendered in a textual fashion. Inserting character U+FE0E after the house with garden character will change it into a monochrome house with a flower:

The emoticon rendered in a textual fashion after adding variation selector-15.
Filed under Office
Last update:
/

Want to spice up the title of your PowerPoint slide.
Does a single emoticon not convey the message you want to send?
Just add another one!

Want to spice up the title of your slide. Does a single emoticon not convey the message you want to send? Just add another one!

Let's take this boring slide:

Slide with only the title text "Run locally"

I'm only showing the top-left corner, the rest of the slide is even more boring.

We can add an emoticon to emphasize the running part.

Slide with the title "Run locally" prefixed with a running person emoticon

But what if we also want to include the local part? Let's add a house emoticon.

Slide with the title "Run locally" prefixed with both a house and running person emoticon

This does not give the right feeling yet, what if we could combine the two a bit more?

Let's merge these two emoticons to set a scene.

  1. Select the running person emoticon and choose Font > Subscript
    Font menu with the Subscript option checked
    Font menu with the Subscript option checked
  2. Select the house emoticon and choose Font > Character Spacing > Condensed by 25pt
    Font menu with the Character Spacing set to Condensed by 25pt
    Font menu with the Character Spacing set to Condensed by 25pt

The actual value might depend on your font-size and emoticon width.

Slide with the title "Run locally" prefixed with a person running in front of a house emoticon

That is it! Much better!

More examples

The same technique can be used to combine several other emoticons in this way.
Just some random examples:

  1. Run through the street
  2. Finish 3rd in a cycling competition
  3. Choose something from the menu
  4. Sales of dinosaurs has increased recently
  5. Save that thread
  6. Comment on the shopping cart contents
Examples of several combinations of emoticons in PowerPoint
Filed under Office
Last update:
/

I recently joined the Advent of Code 2021.
During the first 25 days of December, the challenges made me (re)discover many possibilities with C#, some that are long available but maybe not that well known.

I share my code and list of concepts that might inspire you to discover a feature you were not aware of yet!

Although Eric Wastle has been organizing the Advent of Code since 2015. I only discovered it recently when some colleagues invited me to join the 2021 edition.

Advent of Code is an Advent calendar of small programming puzzles for a variety of skill sets and skill levels that can be solved in any programming language you like.

About

During the first 25 days of December, the challenges made me (re)discover many possibilities with C#, some that are long available but maybe not that well known.

Solutions

I had a blast (and some frustration ;)) solving the challenges, starting early morning, every day.

Some of the noteworthy concepts I have used:

  • Records, both class (C# 9.0) and struct (C# 10.0) based
  • Converting data (bits to int with bit shifting, char to decimal using addition or subtraction, etc.)
  • Efficiently read and slice strings, arrays, and lists using Index and Range (C# 8.0)
  • Work with Stack<T> (.NET Framework 2.0), SortedSet<T> (.NET Framework 4.0), and HashSet<T> (.NET Framework 4.7.2)
  • Using init only setters, with expressions and target typed new expressions (all C#9.0)
  • Many, many more...

I have put all my code and descriptions in my AdventOfCode2021 repo on GitHub. I hope this might inspire you to discover a feature you were not aware of yet!

Filed under C#
Last update:
/

In a previous article I described how to configure an Azure SQL database failover group for high availability across multiple regions.

But what if you want to limit network traffic to a database in this failover group to only your private networks?

In this article I show how to make a SQL database failover group reachable via the Private Link service and make sure the database stays reachable after a failover.

In a previous article I described how to configure an Azure SQL database failover group for high availability across multiple regions.

But what if you want to limit network traffic to a database in this failover group to only your private networks?

In this article I show how to make a SQL database failover group reachable via the Private Link service and make sure the database stays reachable after a failover.

read more...
Filed under Azure, SQL
Last update:
/

Last week I received an invitation for a social work meeting about "Pixel art in spreadsheets".

I thought: "How hard can it be".

Well, it is about 25 lines of C# 9.0 hard! 😀

Last week I received an invitation for a social work meeting about "Pixel art in spreadsheets". I thought: "How hard can it be".

Well, it is about 25 lines of C# 9.0 hard! 😀

read more...
Filed under C#, Office
Last update: