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The other day I attended a meeting where the presenter switched from a PowerPoint slide to demonstrate an application. When he made the switch it was quite obvious the beamer was setup to only display the 4:3 slides to the maximum of the white screen. Since his desktop was in a 16:10 resolution the application was falling of the screen on both sides.
While I was preparing a presentation myself I wanted to be sure my presentation would be in the same resolution as my desktop as I would be switching between my slides and Visual Studio.

The other day I attended a meeting where the presenter switched from a PowerPoint slide to demonstrate an application. When he made the switch it was quite obvious the beamer was setup to only display the 4:3 slides to the maximum of the white screen. Since his desktop was in a 16:10 resolution the application was falling off the screen on both sides. Which was quite a distraction.

While I was preparing a presentation myself I wanted to be sure my presentation would be in the same resolution as my desktop as I would be switching between my slides and Visual Studio.

Choosing your Aspect Ratio

For presentations on a beamer or screen there are 3 common at the moment: 4:3, 16:9 and 16:10. If you don’t know the ratio you can use the maximum resolution to determine the required ratio.

4:3

This is the classic resolution for computer screens. This is also the default for PowerPoint. 800x600, 1024x768, 1152x864 and 1280x960 are common resolutions used with the ratio.

If you show a slide on wide screen you will get black bars on the side.

A PowerPoint slide with a 4:3 ratio shows black bars on the side using a 16:10 screen.
A 4:3 slide on a 16:10 screen. Showing black bars on the side.

16:9

This ratio is commonly used by HD screens and beamers. 1366x768, 1280x720, 1600x900 and 1920x1080 are common resolutions used with this ratio.

If you show a slide in this ratio on a 4:3 or 16:10 screen you will get black bars on the top and bottom.

A PowerPoint slide with a 16:9 ratio shows black bars on the top and bottom using a 16:10 screen.
A 16:9 slide on a 16:10 screen. Showing black bars on the top and bottom.

16:10

This ratio was commonly used by modern screen and beamers, but is now disappearing. 1280x800, 1440x900 and 1920x1200 are common resolutions used with the ratio.

If you show a slide in this ratio on a 4:3 screen you will get black bars on the top and bottom. On a 16:9 screen you will get black bars on the side.

A PowerPoint slide with a 16:10 ratio shows no black bars on a 16:10 screen.
A 16:10 slide on a 16:10 screen. No black bars showing.

Setting the aspect ratio in PowerPoint

It’s easy to set the required aspect ratio:

  1. In PowerPoint go the Design tab on the ribbon.
  2. Click on Page Setup.
    The PowerPoint application with the "Design" tab selected on the ribbon.
  3. At Slides sized for set the desired ratio.
    The "Page Setup" dialog with the ratio dropdown box displaying several ratio's including 4:3, 16:9 and 16:10.
  4. Press the OK button and you’re set.
Filed under Office
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With the launch of Visual Studio 2010 this week a lot of people will start upgrading to the new version. After the installation was complete I noticed the Surface project and item templates were not available.
In this post I explain how to get the entries in Visual Studio 2010.

With the launch of Visual Studio 2010 this week a lot of people will start upgrading to the new version. After the installation was complete I noticed the Surface project and item templates were not available. In this post I explain how to get the entries in Visual Studio 2010.

First of all you need to realize that the templates are part of the Microsoft Surface SDK. If you have it installed, skip the next paragraph.

INSTALLING the SURFACE SDK

If you are running Windows 7 or a Windows Vista x64, you need to apply the changes described in a previous post: .

If you don’t have Visual Studio 2008 on your system and want to start with Visual Studio 2010 from scratch some additional steps are needed patching the Surface SDK Installer. For details on the patch process see the earlier referenced post.

Patching the installer

When you’re patching the MSI with the Orca tool remove also the following conditions:

  1. Select the row with Installed OR (VS2008SPLEVEL AND VS2008CSPROJSUPPORT) OR VCSEXP2008SPLEVEL and choose Drop row
  2. Select the row with Installed OR (VS2008SPLEVEL AND VS2008SPLEVEL >= "#0") OR (VCSEXP2008SPLEVEL AND VCSEXP2008SPLEVEL >= "#0") and choose Drop row
  3. Select the row with Installed OR DEXPLORE and choose Drop row
  4. Select the row with Installed OR VS90DEVENV OR NOT VS2008SPLEVEL and choose Drop row
  5. Select the row with Installed OR VCSHARP90EXPRESS OR NOT VCSEXP2008SPLEVEL and choose Drop row

Copying the Templates from the SDK

Now that you have installed the Surface SDK the subsequent steps are quite simple.

The following lines are for x64 systems. If you’re running on x86 change Program Files (x86) into Program Files.

xcopy /s "C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio 9.0\Common7\IDE\ItemTemplates\CSharp\Surface\v1.0" "C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio 10.0\Common7\IDE\ItemTemplates\CSharp\Surface\1033\"
xcopy /s "C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio 9.0\Common7\IDE\ProjectTemplates\CSharp\Surface\v1.0" "C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio 10.0\Common7\IDE\ProjectTemplates\CSharp\Surface\1033\"
cd "C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio 10.0\Common7\IDE"
devenv /setup

After this is finished launch Visual Studio 2010.

Screenshot with the "New Project" dialog displaying the Surface Application templates.
The “New Project” dialog with the Surface Application templates listed.

(Remember to select .NET Framework 3.5)

Screenshot with the "Add New Item" dialog displaying the Surface Control templates.
The “Add New Item” dialog with the Surface Control templates listed.
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Today the Microsoft Virtualization Team announced the availability of the new beta version of the Linux Integration Services for Hyper-V.
In this post I will try the new features.

Today the Microsoft Virtualization Team . There are three big changes in this version:

  • Virtual machines will be able to use up to 4 virtual CPU’s.
  • Virtual machines will be able to synchronize their time with the parent partition.
  • Virtual machines will be able to shutdown gracefully from the Hyper-V manager.

In this post I will try the new features.

Linux Integration Services for Hyper-V 2.0

First I got a VM (Virtual Machine) installed as described in my previous post . I used the current released stable version of the LIS (Linux Integration Services): Version 2.0.

Screenshot displaying the VMBUS information on booting the virtual machine. Build Date=Jun 29 2009 and Build Description=Version 2.0.
On boot time VMBUS displays Version 2.0

My Hyper-V host only has a dual-core CPU. So it’s impossible for me to test the 4 CPU support. I couldn’t find any differences with 2 CPU’s.

Shutdown from Hyper-V Console

With the current version of the LIS when I press the shutdown button I get the following error:

Screenshot displaying the Hyper-V console showing the error text: "The application encountered an error while attempting to change the state of 'BlogDemo'. Failed to shut down the virtual machine.".
Hyper-V Console shows the error Failed to shut down the virtual machine.

Time synchronization

With the current version of the LIS I had a lot of trouble with the clock of the VM getting out of sync very fast. I did a post to fix this: .

I didn’t implement the fix on the VM I created for this post to demonstrate the problem:

Screenshot displaying the Hyper-V console showing the VM gets a time difference of multiple=
The VM gets an offset of multiple seconds within minutes.

Linux Integration Services for Hyper-V 2.1 Beta

To get the beta drivers you need to download them from the Microsoft Connect website. (Look for the Linux Integration Services for Hyper-V project site).

I installed the new drivers in exact the same way as the 2.0.

Screenshot displaying the VMBUS information on booting the virtual machine. Build Date=Mar 23 2010 and Build Description=Version 2.1.2.
On boot time VMBUS displays Version 2.1.2

Not only the new version number is displayed, also the new Shutdown and Timesync channels are mentioned!

Shutdown from Hyper-V Console

Pressing the shutdown button now gives a more expected result:

Screenshot displaying the virtual machine has received the shutdown command and starts the poweroff sequence.
The VM receives the signal to shutdown and calls /sbin/poweroff
Screenshot displaying the Hyper-V console with the message: "The virtual machine is truned off".
The VM is gracefully turned off.

Time synchronization

With the new LIS the time is pretty much stable, nothing the NTP service can handle. There is no need to change the boot command in grub anymore.

Screenshot displaying the Hyper-V console showing the VM shows minimal time difference over the course of minutes.
The VM only shows a minimal time difference over the course of minutes.
Filed under Hyper-V
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I wanted to use the new REST services in SharePoint 2010.
But when I navigated to the ListData.svc service. I got the following error: “Could not load type 'System.Data.Services.Providers.IDataServiceUpdateProvider' from assembly 'System.Data.Services, Version=3.5.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089'.”

I wanted to use the new REST services in SharePoint 2010. But when I navigated to the ListData.svc service. I got the following error:

Screenshot displaying SharePoint 2010 showing the following error: "Could not load type 'System.Data.Services.Providers.IDataServiceUpdateProvider' from assembly 'System.Data.Services, Version=3.5.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089'."

First I checked if there was a System.Data.Services entry in the GAC (Global Assembly Cache). There was one with version 3.5.30729.1. So it wasn’t a case of a missing file.

Searching the web on the error Could not load type 'System.­Data.­Services.­Providers.­IDataServiceUpdateProvider' from assembly 'System.­Data.­Services, Version=3.5.0.0, Culture=­neutral, PublicKeyToken=­b77a5c561934e089' does not provide many hints to what is causing this error.
Most sites suggest to install ADO.NET Data Services v1.5 CTP2, but I already had.

I finally found the page by . He suggests to install the ADO.NET Data Services Update for .NET 3.5 SP1. As it turns out, this is the final release of the ADO.NET Services v1.5!

The update comes in two flavors.

For Windows 7 AND Windows Server 2008 R2

Download the ADO.NET Data Services Update for .NET Framework 3.5 SP1 for Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2.

After installing the version of the System.Data.Services.dll file is 3.5.30729.5004.

For Windows 2000, Windows XP, Windows Vista, Windows Server 2003 AND Windows Server 2008

Download the ADO.NET Data Services Update for .NET Framework 3.5 SP1 for Windows 2000, Windows Server 2003, Windows XP, Windows Vista and Windows Server 2008.

After installing the version of the System.Data.Services.dll file is 3.5.30729.4466.

Testing

After I installed the update I browsed to the ListData.svc service.

Screenshot displaying the service description of a SharePoint 2010 Team Site as an atom feed.
The service description of a SharePoint 2010 Team Site as an atom feed.
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Today the news broke Microsoft has extended the support for installations of Windows SharePoint Services 3.0 SP1, Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007 SP1 and Project Server 2007 SP1.

As I wrote in . But today I discovered Microsoft has extended the support for installations of Windows SharePoint Services 3.0 SP1, Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007 SP1 and Project Server 2007 SP1.

On the pages for Windows SharePoint Services 3.0 Service Pack 1 and 2007 Microsoft Office Servers Service Pack 1 the new retirement date is set for .